Changeset 3064


Ignore:
Timestamp:
Jun 5, 2006, 9:51:53 AM (18 years ago)
Author:
sexton
Message:

onslow report updates

Location:
production/onslow_2006
Files:
59 added
72 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • production/onslow_2006/make_report.py

    r3015 r3064  
    8585                             label_id,
    8686                             report = True,
    87                              plot_quantity = ['stage', 'velocity'],
     87                             plot_quantity = ['stage', 'speed'],
    8888                             time_min = None,
    8989                             time_max = None,
  • production/onslow_2006/report/HAT_damage.tex

    r2974 r3064  
    11\begin{figure}[hbt]
    22%\centerline{ \includegraphics[width=100mm, height=75mm]{../report_figures/.jpg}} 
    3 \caption{Damage modelling for highest astronomical tide for Onslow region (in m).} 
     3\caption{Damage modelling for 1.5 AHD for Onslow region.} 
    44\label{fig:HAT_damage}
    55\end{figure}
  • production/onslow_2006/report/HAT_map.tex

    r2974 r3064  
    11\begin{figure}[hbt]
    22%\centerline{ \includegraphics[width=100mm, height=75mm]{../report_figures/.jpg}} 
    3 \caption{Maximum inundation map for highest astronomical tide for Onslow region (in m).} 
     3\caption{Maximum inundation map for 1.5 AHD for Onslow region (in m).} 
    44\label{fig:HAT_max_inundation}
    55\end{figure}
  • production/onslow_2006/report/LAT_damage.tex

    r2974 r3064  
    11\begin{figure}[hbt]
    22%\centerline{ \includegraphics[width=100mm, height=75mm]{../report_figures/.jpg}} 
    3 \caption{Damage modelling for lowest astronomical tide for Onslow region (in m).} 
     3\caption{Damage modelling for -1.5 AHD for Onslow region.} 
    44\label{fig:LAT_damage}
    55\end{figure}
  • production/onslow_2006/report/LAT_map.tex

    r2974 r3064  
    11\begin{figure}[hbt]
    22%\centerline{ \includegraphics[width=100mm, height=75mm]{../report_figures/.jpg}} 
    3 \caption{Maximum inundation map for lowest astronomical tide for Onslow region (in m).} 
     3\caption{Maximum inundation map for -1.5 AHD for Onslow region (in m).} 
    44\label{fig:LAT_max_inundation}
    55\end{figure}
  • production/onslow_2006/report/MSL_damage.tex

    r2974 r3064  
    11\begin{figure}[hbt]
    22%\centerline{ \includegraphics[width=100mm, height=75mm]{../report_figures/.jpg}} 
    3 \caption{Damage modelling for mean sea level for Onslow region (in m).} 
     3\caption{Damage modelling for 0 AHD for Onslow region.} 
    44\label{fig:MSL_damage}
    55\end{figure}
  • production/onslow_2006/report/MSL_map.tex

    r2974 r3064  
    11\begin{figure}[hbt]
    22%\centerline{ \includegraphics[width=100mm, height=75mm]{../report_figures/.jpg}} 
    3 \caption{Maximum inundation map for mean sea level for Onslow region (in m).} 
     3\caption{Maximum inundation map for 0 AHD for Onslow region (in m).} 
    44\label{fig:MSL_max_inundation}
    55\end{figure}
  • production/onslow_2006/report/computational_setup.tex

    r3024 r3064  
    1 To initiate the modelling, the computational mesh is constructed to
    2 cover the available data. The resolution is chosen to balance
     1To initiate the modelling, a computational triangular mesh is constructed to
     2cover the study regions which has an area of around 6300 km$^2$.
     3The cell size is chosen to balance
    34computational time and desired resolution in areas of interest,
    4 particularly in the interface between the on and offshore. The
    5 following figure illustrates the data extent for the
    6 scenario and where further mesh refinement has been made. The choice
     5particularly in the interface between the on and offshore.
     6Figure \ref{fig:onslow_area} illustrates the data extent for the
     7scenario, the study area and where further mesh refinement has been made.
     8The choice
    79of the refinement is based around the important inter-tidal zones and
    810other important features such as islands and rivers. The most northern
    911boundary of the study area is placed approximately around the 100m contour
    1012line.
    11 The resultant computational mesh is then seen in figure \ref{fig:mesh_onslow}
    12 which has an area of around 6300 km$^2$.
    1313
    1414\begin{figure}[hbt]
     
    1717             {../report_figures/onslow_data_poly.png}}
    1818
    19   \caption{Study area for Onslow scenario highlighting areas of increased refinement.}
     19  \caption{Study area for Onslow scenario highlighting areas of increased refinement.
     20The underlying data is as in Figure \ref{fig:onslow_data_area}.}
    2021  \label{fig:onslow_area}
    2122\end{figure}
    2223
     24For the simulations, we have chosen a cell area of 500 m$^2$ per triangle for the
     25region surrounding the Onslow town centre. It is worth noting here that the cell
     26area will be the maximum cell area within the defined region and that each cell in
     27the region does not necessarily have the same area. The cell area is increased
     28to 2500 m$^2$ for the region surrounding the coast and further increased
     29to 20000 m$^2$ for the region reaching approximately the 50m contour line.
     30The remainder of the study area has a cell area of 100000 m$^2$.
     31The resultant computational mesh is then seen in Figure \ref{fig:mesh_onslow}.
     32
     33With these cell areas in place, the study area consists of 440150 triangles
     34in which water levels and momentums are tracked through time.
     35The associated lateral accuracy
     36for these cell areas is approximatly 30m, 70m, 200m and 445m for the respective
     37areas. This means
     38that we can only be confident in the calculated inundation extent to approximately
     3930m lateral accuracy within the Onslow town centre.
     40Referring to the discussion in Section \ref{sec:anuga}, it is important
     41to refine the mesh to be commensurate with the underlying data especially in
     42those regions where complex behaviour will occur, such as the inter-tidal
     43zone and estuaries. Our choice of cell area for the region surrounding the
     44Onslow town centre is commensurate with the onshore data used for this study
     45(see Section \ref{sec:data}). In contrast to the onshore data, the offshore
     46data is a series of survey points which is typically not supplied on a fixed
     47grid which complicates the issue of determining an appropriate cell area.
     48If we refer to the discussion in Section \ref{sec:data}
     49on modelling a tsunami wave in deep water, we can determine an appropriate
     50cell area for the deeper water. Here,
     51the wavelength of the tsunami wave is approximately 20km
     52near the boundary, which indicates that our cell area is more than adequate
     53to propagate the tsunami wave.
    2354
    2455\begin{figure}[hbt]
    2556
    26   %\centerline{ \includegraphics[width=100mm, height=75mm]
    27   %            {../report_figures/.png}}
     57  \centerline{ \includegraphics[width=100mm, height=75mm]
     58              {../report_figures/mesh.jpg}}
    2859
    29   \caption{Computational mesh for Onslow study area}
     60  \caption{Computational mesh for Onslow study area.}
    3061  \label{fig:mesh_onslow}
    3162\end{figure}
    3263
    33 For the simulations, we have chosen a resolution of 500 m$^2$ for the
    34 region surrounding the Onslow town centre. The resolution is increased
    35 to 2500 m$^2$ for the region surrounding the coast and further increased
    36 to 20000 m$^2$ for the region reaching approximately the 50m contour line.
    37 The remainder of the study area has a resolution of 100000 m$^2$.
    38 With these resolutions in place, the study area consists of 440150 triangles.
    39 The associated accuracy
    40 for these resolutions is approximatly 22m, 50m, 140m and 315m for the increasing
    41 resolutions. This means
    42 that we can only be confident in the calculated inundation to approximately
    43 22m accuracy within the Onslow town centre.
    44 This is because ANUGA calculates whether each cell in the triangular
    45 mesh is wet or dry. It is important
    46 to refine the mesh to be commensurate with the underlying data especially in
    47 those regions where complex behaviour will occur, such as the inter-tidal
    48 zone and estuaries.
    4964
    50 Whilst friction has been incorporated into the model, we have not
    51 implemented it here.
    52 We have an outstanding issue with regard how friction is
    53 modelled which is not yet resolved.
     65
  • production/onslow_2006/report/damage.tex

    r3024 r3064  
    11
    2 This section deals with modelling the damage to infrastructure as a result
    3 of the inundation described in the previous sections.
    4 The National Building Exposure Database (NBED) has been
     2This section deals with impact modelling which covers damage
     3modelling and economic impact analysis.
     4
     5Damage modelling refers to damage
     6to infrastructure as a result
     7of the inundation described in the previous sections. The infrastructure
     8refers to residential structures only and is sourced from the
     9the National Building Exposure Database (NBED). The NBED has been
    510created by Geoscience Australia so that consistent risk assessments for a range
    6 of natural hazards can be conducted~
    7 \footnote{http://www.ga.gov.au/urban/projects/ramp/NBED.jsp}.
    8 The NBED contains information
    9 about buildings, people, infrastructure, structure value and building contents.
    10 It is important to note here that the NBED contains information about
    11 residential structures only. From this database, we find that there
     11of natural hazards can be
     12conducted\footnote{http://www.ga.gov.au/urban/projects/ramp/NBED.jsp}.
     13It contains information
     14about residential buildings, people, infrastructure,
     15structure value and building contents.
     16From this database, we find that there
    1217are 325 residential structures and a population of approximately 770
    1318in Onslow \footnote{Population is determined by census data and an ABS housing survey).
     
    1520Once the maximum inundation is calculated for each building, the resultant
    1621damage
    17 can then be determined as a function of its type and location from the
     22can be determined as a function of its type and location from the
    1823coastline, \cite{ken:damage}.
     24
     25results here
    1926
    2027Impact on indigeneous communities are important considerations when determining
    2128tsunami impact, especially as a number of communities exist in coastal regions.
    22 These communities are typcially not included in national residential databases
     29These communities are typically not included in national residential databases
    2330and would be therefore overlooked in damage model estimates.
    2431There is one indigeneous community located in this study area as seen
    25 in figure
    26 \ref{fig:communities}. The population of the Bindibindi community is 140
     32in Figure
     33\ref{fig:gauges}. The population of the Bindibindi community is 140
    2734and is situated in a potentially vulnerable location.
    2835
    29 \begin{figure}[hbt]
     36discussion on Mary's outputs
    3037
    31   \centerline{ \includegraphics[width=100mm, height=75mm]
    32 {../report_figures/onslow_communities.png}}
    33 
    34   \caption{Location of indigeneous communities in study area.}
    35   \label{fig:communities}
    36 \end{figure}
  • production/onslow_2006/report/data.tex

    r3024 r3064  
    11The calculated run-up height and resulting inundation ashore is determined by
    2 the input topographic and bathymetric data, the forcing terms, the
    3 initial and boundary conditions, as well as the cell resolution. It
    4 would be ideal if the data adequately captures all complex features
    5 of the underlying bathymetry and topography and that the cell
    6 resolution be commensurate with the underlying data. Any limitations
    7 in terms of resolution and accuracy in the data will introduce
    8 errors to the inundation maps as well as the range of model approximations,
    9 including the cell resolution.
     2the input topographic and bathymetric elevation, the forcing terms, the
     3initial and boundary conditions, as well as the cell area of the computational
     4mesh.
     5Ideally, the data should adequately capture all complex features
     6of the underlying bathymetry and topography and that mesh
     7is commensurate with the underlying data. Any limitations
     8in the resolution and accuracy of the data will introduce
     9errors to the inundation maps as well as the model approximations.
    1010
    11 A number of sources have supplied data for this study. With
     11Data for this study have been sourced from a number of agencies. With
    1212respect to the onshore data, the Defence Imagery and Geospatial
    1313Organisation (DIGO) supplied the DTED (Digital Terrain Elevation
     
    1515Warning System use only. This data has a resolution of 1 second
    1616(about 30 metres), produced from 1:50 000 contours, elevations and
    17 drainage. The Department of Land Information (DLI) has provided a
    18 20m DEM and orthophotography covering the NW Shelf. As the 30m
    19 DTED Level 2 data is bare earth we have chosen to use this as
    20 the onshore data set.
     17drainage. In addition, the Department of Land Information (DLI) has provided a
     1820m DEM and orthophotography covering the NW Shelf. However, the 30m
     19DTED Level 2 data is "bare earth" whereas the DLI data is distorted by vegetation
     20and buildings so we have chosen to use the DTED as the onshore
     21topographic data set.
    2122
    2223With respect to the offshore data, the Department of Planning and
    23 Infrastructure have provided state digital fairsheet data around
     24Infrastructure (DPI) have provided state digital fairsheet data around
    2425Onslow. This data covers only a very small geographic area. (Note,
    25 similar data has also been provided for Pt Hedland and Broome.)
    26 The Australian Hydrographic Office fairsheet data has also been utilised.
     26similar data has been provided for Pt Hedland and Broome by DPI.)
     27The Australian Hydrographic Office (AHO) has supplied extensive
     28fairsheet data which has also been utilised.
    2729
    2830In summary,
     
    3436DLI & Onshore, 20m DEM and orthophotography \\ \hline
    3537DPI & Offshore, fairsheet data around Onslow \\ \hline
     38AHO & Offshore, fairsheet data for North West Shelf region \\ \hline
    3639\end{tabular}
    3740\end{center}
    3841
    3942The coastline has been generated from the DIGO DTED Level 2 and modified
    40 using the aerial photography and the two detailed surveys provided
     43using the aerial photography and two detailed surveys provided
    4144by WA Department of Planning and Infrastructure.
    4245
    4346The extent of the
    4447data used for the tsunami impact modelling can be seen in the
    45 following figure. The study area covers approximately 100km of coastline
     48Figure \ref{onslow_data_area}. The study area covers approximately 100km of coastline
    4649and extends offshore to the 100m contour line and inshore to approximately 10m
    4750elevation.
     
    5760
    5861
    59 Section \ref{sec:metadata} outlines the metadata for data used for
     62Section \ref{sec:metadata} provid more details and metadata for data used for
    6063this study.
    6164
  • production/onslow_2006/report/interpretation.tex

    r3004 r3064  
    1 %\clearpage
    2 The following subsections detail the time series at the locations
    3 described in the previous table
    4 %table \ref{table:gaugelocations}
    5 for Highest Astronomical Tide (HAT), Lowest Astronomical Tide (LAT) and
    6 Mean Sea Level (MSL) conditions. These locations
    7 have been chosen to assist in describing the features of the tsunami wave
    8 and the resultant impact ashore. Here, we assume that MSL coincides with
    9 AHD zero. This is a standard assumption and confirmed with the WA DPI.
    10 The graph ranges for both stage and
    11 velocity are made consistent for each of comparison. In addition, velocities
    12 under 0.001 m/s are not shown. As a useful benchmark, the following table
     1
     2The following attempts to describe the main features of the
     3tsunami wave and resultant impact ashore. To assist this description, we have
     4chosen a number of locations which we believe would be important
     5in an emergency situation, such as the hospital and power station, or
     6effect recovery efforts, such as the airport and docks. These locations
     7are described in table \ref{table:gaugelocations} and shown in
     8Figure \ref{fig:gauges}. The supporting graphs are shown in
     9Section \ref{sec:timeseries} which show how the stage and speed
     10vary with time at a particular location. Stage is
     11defined as the water depth above the point elevation.
     12For ease of comparison,
     13the graphs ranges are made consistent and speeds under 0.001 m/s
     14are not shown. As a useful benchmark, the table
     15\ref{table:speed_examples}
    1316describes typical examples for a range of velocities found in the
    1417simulations.
     
    3235\end{table}
    3336
    34 In simulating different tidal conditions, we assume that the
    35 tidal conditions are the same for all locations in the study region.
    36 It is worth noting here that ANUGA does not model tidal effects (that is,
    37 the change in water height over time). To incorporate this effect in
    38 a consistent way would also involve having information about the
    39 difference in tide heights for every location in the region. This
    40 information is not available on a national scale,
    41 therefore our approach of applying a uniform change in water
    42 height is a reasonable one.
    4337
    44 The Australian Hydrographic Office fair sheet for Onslow describes the
    45 chart datum to be LAT with MSL and HAT being 1.5 and 3 respectively. This
    46 then places HAT and LAT at 1.5 AHD and -1.5 AHD respectively. Other
    47 detail on the chart describes the blah de blah mark to be MHWS.
    48 
    49 Hamish/Kathryn - does the Onslow coastline coincide with the yellow bit on the
    50 Onslow map? If so, does that place AHD 0 at MHWS?
    51 
    52 It is evident from figure \ref{fig:ic_high}
    53 that much of Onslow would be inundated at Highest Astronomical Tide (HAT)
    54 (1.5m above MSL).
    55 HAT is the projected tide on a 19 year cycle (occurring when a number of
    56 astronomical conditions happen simultaneously), and Mean High Water Springs
    57 (MHWS) is the tide which is projected to occur ... (get the words
    58 from the ANTT 06). The
    59 Australian National Tidal Tables 2006 determines MHWS for Onslow to be 1m
    60 (adjusted to AHD) which also places regions within the study area under
    61 water before a tsunami wave reaches the shore. Using HAT or even
    62 MHWS in this way has significant infrastructure inundated which does not
    63 seem reasonable. Therefore, we show results for MSL only and
    64 provide a
    65 qualitative discussion on the changes to the inundation at HAT and LAT. 
    66 
    67 \begin{figure}[hbt]
    68 
    69   %\centerline{ \includegraphics[width=100mm, height=75mm]{../report_figures/.png}}
    70 
    71   \caption{Initial condition for mean sea level.}
    72   \label{fig:ic_zero}
    73 \end{figure}
    74 
    75 \begin{figure}[hbt]
    76 
    77   %\centerline{ \includegraphics[width=100mm, height=75mm]{../report_figures/.png}}
    78 
    79   \caption{Initial condition for lowest astronomical tide.}
    80   \label{fig:ic_low}
    81 \end{figure}
    82 
    83 \begin{figure}[hbt]
    84 
    85   %\centerline{ \includegraphics[width=100mm, height=75mm]{../report_figures/.png}}
    86 
    87   \caption{Initial condition for highest astronomical tide.}
    88   \label{fig:ic_high}
    89 \end{figure}
    90 
    91 Examining the offshore gauges, the drawdown prior to the tsunami wave
     38Examining the offshore locations, the drawdown prior to the tsunami wave
    9239arriving at the shore can be seen to occur around 230 mins 
    9340(3.8 hours) after the tsunami is generated.
     
    9542West of Groyne and the mouth of Beadon Creek, for example. The first wave
    9643after the drawdown ranges from approximatly 2m in the
    97 west of Beadon Bay to 1.5m in the east of Beadon Bay. The velocity
     44west of Beadon Bay to 1.5m in the east of Beadon Bay. The speed
    9845sharply increases at drawdown with further increases as the
    9946wave grows in amplitude.
     
    10552and the direction of the tsunami wave.
    10653
    107 The maximum velocity found for the offshore gauges occurs at the West of
    108 Groyne location with velocities halved at the Beadon Bay west location.
    109 The Beadon Bay west velocity is greater that the gauge in the east of Beadon
    110 Bay. There is similar differences in amplitude (from drawdown to maximum
    111 amplitude), however, the west gauge is in deeper water than the east
    112 gauge which may indicate the increased velocity found in the east of the
     54The maximum speed found for the offshore locations occur at the West of
     55Groyne location with speeds halved at the Beadon Bay west location.
     56The Beadon Bay west speed is greater that the east of Beadon
     57Bay location. There is similar differences in amplitude (from drawdown to maximum
     58amplitude), however, the western location is in deeper water than the eastern
     59location which may indicate the increased speed found in the east of the
    11360bay. 
    11461
     
    12168%West of Groyne and Beadon Creek locations.
    12269
    123 ({\bf Note, these words are assuming that the current simulations are OK,
    124 and will have to be updated once we have more information about
    125 the tides etc}).
    12670It is evident for each simulation that the sand dunes west of
    127 Onslow are very effective in halting the tsunami wave. The height of these
     71Onslow are very effective in halting the tsunami wave,
     72see Figures \ref{fig:HAT_map}, \ref{fig:MSL_map} and
     73\ref{fig:LAT_map}. The height of these
    12874sand dunes are approximately 10m which is more than enough to halt
    12975the largest of the tsunami waves which occurs for the
    130 high tide simulation. There is inundation between the sand dunes at high
    131 tide, however, this water penetrated from the north east (via
    132 Onslow town cetnre) rather than seaward.
     761.5 AHD simulation. There is inundation between the sand dunes at high
     77tide, Figure \ref{fig:HAT_map}, however, this water
     78penetrated from the north east (via
     79Onslow town centre) rather than seaward.
    13380The same feature is evident for the sand dunes east of Onslow which
    134 rise to 15m in height. Currently, ANUGA can not model changes
     81rise to 15m in height. Currently, we do not model changes
    13582to the bathymetry or topography due to effects of the water flow.
    13683Therefore, we do not know whether these sand dunes would withstand the
     
    13885
    13986The wave penetrates the river east of Onslow with increasingly
    140 greater inundation as the tide changes from LAT to HAT.
     87greater inundation between the -1.5 AHD and 1.5 AHD simulations.
    14188
    142 As expected, there is greater inundation at high tide. The major road
     89As expected, there is greater inundation at 1.5 AHD. The major road
    14390into Onslow, the Onslow Mount Stuart Rd, remains free of inundation for
    144 all tidal scenarios. Beadon Creek Rd which services the wharf in the
    145 river becomes increasingly inundated as the tide rises. Only the
    146 entry to the wharf on Beadon Creek Rd is sufficiently inundated at LAT
    147 to stop traffic. At HAT however, essentially the entire road
     91all simulations. Beadon Creek Rd which services the wharf in the
     92river becomes increasingly inundated as the initial condition
     93changes from 0 AHD to 1.5 AHD. Only the
     94entry to the wharf on Beadon Creek Rd is sufficiently inundated at -1.5 AHD
     95to stop traffic. At 1.5 AHD however, essentially the entire road
    14896would be impassable.
    14997
    15098There is significant inundation of at
    151 least 2m on the foreshore of Onslow for MSL and HAT.
    152 The inundation extent increases as the tide rises, pushing the edges
     99least 2m on the foreshore of Onslow for 0 AHD and 1.5 AHD.
     100The inundation extent increases the initial condition increases above 0 AHD,
     101pushing the edges
    153102of the majority of the road infrastructure in the Onslow town centre.
  • production/onslow_2006/report/introduction.tex

    r3024 r3064  
    1818is part of the Shire of Ashburton in the Pilbara region of Western Autralia
    1919\footnote{http://www.pdc.wa.gov.au/region/political.htm}. Onslow supports
    20 a variety of industries, including oil, gas, mining, cattle, fishing and tourism.
     20a variety of industries, including oil, gas, mining, cattle,
     21fishing and tourism.
    2122
    22 The return period of this particular scenario is unknown, however it
    23 can be be classed as a plausible event. Future studies
    24 will present a series of scenarios for a range of return events to
    25 assist FESA in developing appropriate plans for a range of event impacts.
    26 The software tool, ANUGA, has been used to develop the inundation extent
    27 and associated water height at various points in space and time.
    28 ANUGA has been developed by GA and the Australian National University
    29 (ANU) to solve the nonlinear shallow water
    30 wave equation using the finite volume technique
    31 (described in \cite{ON:modsim}).
    32 An advantage of this technique is that the cell resolution can be changed
    33 according to areas of interest and that wetting and drying
    34 is treated robustly as part of the numerical scheme.
    35 ANUGA is continually being developed and validated.
    36 As such, the current results represent ongoing work
    37 and may change in the future.
     23The report will outline the methods of modelling the tsunami from its
     24source to its impact ashore. Section {sec:tsunami_scenarios} provides
     25the background to the scenario used for this study. Whilst
     26the return period of this scenario is unknown, it
     27can be be classed as a plausible event.
     28Future studies
     29will present a series of scenarios for a range of periods to
     30assist FESA in developing appropriate plans for a range of event impacts.
     31The modelling technique to develop the
     32impact ashore will be discussed in Section \ref{sec:anuga} with data inputs
     33discussed in Section \ref{sec:data}.
     34Inundation results shown in Section \ref{sec:results} and
     35impact modelling results shown in Section \ref{sec:damage}.
     36The report concludes with a summary of the results detailing issues
     37regarding data and modelling.
    3838
    39 The following set of information is required input to undertake the tsunami
    40 impact modelling and will be discussed in following sections.
    41 
    42 \begin{itemize}
    43 \item onshore and offshore data
    44 \item initial condition
    45 \item boundary condition
    46 \end{itemize}
    47 
    48 The inundation results for the Onslow area is described in section
    49 \ref{sec:results}.
  • production/onslow_2006/report/onslow_2006_report.tex

    r3016 r3064  
    5050    \label{sec:intro}
    5151  \input{introduction}
    52  
     52   
     53  \section{Tsunami scenarios}
     54    \label{sec:tsunami_scenarios}
     55    \input{tsunami_scenario}
     56
     57   \section{Inundation Model}
     58    \label{sec:anuga}
     59    \input{anuga}
     60    \input{computational_setup}
     61   
    5362  \section{Data sources}
    5463    \label{sec:data}
    5564    \input{data}
    5665   
    57   \section{Tsunami scenarios}
    58     \label{sec:tsunami_scenarios}
    59     \input{tsunami_scenario}
    60    
    61   \section{Inundation modelling results}
     66  \section{Modelling results}
    6267     \label{sec:results}
    63      \input{computational_setup}
    64      
    65 \begin{table} \label{table:gaugelocations}
    66 \caption{Defined gauge locations for Onslow study area.}
     68         
     69\begin{table} \label{table:locations}
     70\caption{Defined point locations for Tsunami impact modelling for the North West shelf: Onslow study area.}
    6771\begin{center}
    6872\begin{tabular}{|l|l|l|l|}\hline
    69 \bf{Gauge Name} & \bf{Easting} & \bf{Northing} & \bf{Elevation}\\ \hline
    70 Beadon Point Loading Berth & 302986.51 & 7607334.65 & 0.00 \\ \hline
    71 Hospital & 304973.04 & 7605500.42 & 0.00 \\ \hline
    72 Bindi Bindi Community & 305430.37 & 7605586.65 & 0.00 \\ \hline
    73 Power Station & 305687.62 & 7605062.62 & 0.00 \\ \hline
    74 Airport Runway & 304471.19 & 7602750.41 & 0.00 \\ \hline
    75 Beadon Creek Docks & 306622.77 & 7604706.10 & 0.00 \\ \hline
    76 West of Groyne & 306556.76 & 7605791.87 & 0.00 \\ \hline
    77 Beadon Creek mouth & 306626.50 & 7605532.27 & 0.00 \\ \hline
    78 Beadon Creek south of dock & 306676.87 & 7604408.63 & 0.00 \\ \hline
    79 Centre dam wall & 308516.86 & 7603955.82 & 0.00 \\ \hline
    80 Dam overflow & 307913.42 & 7604034.90 & 0.00 \\ \hline
    81 Light Tower & 304562.88 & 7606431.74 & 0.00 \\ \hline
    82 Beadon Bay west & 305311.01 & 7606557.16 & 0.00 \\ \hline
    83 Beadon Bay east & 307989.36 & 7606591.95 & 0.00 \\ \hline
     73\bf{Point Name} & \bf{Easting} & \bf{Northing} & \bf{Elevation}\\ \hline
     74Beadon Point Loading Berth & 302986.51 & 7607334.65 & -8.69 \\ \hline
     75Hospital & 304973.04 & 7605500.42 & 7.56 \\ \hline
     76Bindi Bindi Community & 305430.37 & 7605586.65 & 1.00 \\ \hline
     77Power Station & 305687.62 & 7605062.62 & 5.17 \\ \hline
     78Airport Runway & 304471.19 & 7602750.41 & 3.00 \\ \hline
     79Beadon Creek Docks & 306622.77 & 7604706.10 & 1.76 \\ \hline
     80West of Groyne & 306556.76 & 7605791.87 & -2.10 \\ \hline
     81Beadon Creek mouth & 306626.50 & 7605532.27 & -2.80 \\ \hline
     82Beadon Creek south of dock & 306676.87 & 7604408.63 & -1.49 \\ \hline
     83Centre dam wall & 308516.86 & 7603955.82 & 3.00 \\ \hline
     84Dam overflow & 307913.42 & 7604034.90 & 1.53 \\ \hline
     85Light Tower & 304562.88 & 7606431.74 & 1.47 \\ \hline
     86Beadon Bay west & 305311.01 & 7606557.16 & -4.61 \\ \hline
     87Beadon Bay east & 307989.36 & 7606591.95 & -3.56 \\ \hline
    8488\end{tabular}
    8589  \end{center}
    8690 \end{table}
    8791 
     92
     93\caption{Point locations used for Onslow study.} 
     94\label{fig:points}
     95\end{figure}
    8896\input{interpretation}
    89 \subsection{Lowest Astronomical Tide}
     97\input{MSL_map}
     98 \clearpage
    9099 
    91100\input{LAT_map}
    92101 \clearpage
    93102 
    94 \input{latexoutput20060426004237}
    95  \clearpage
    96  
    97 \subsection{Highest Astronomical Tide}
    98  
    99103\input{HAT_map}
    100  \clearpage
    101  
    102 \input{latexoutput20060426004129}
    103104 \clearpage
    104105 
     
    106107   \section{Damage modelling}
    107108     \input{damage}
    108 \subsection{Lowest Astronomical Tide}
     109\input{MSL_damage}
     110 \clearpage
    109111 
    110112\input{LAT_damage}
    111113 \clearpage
    112  
    113 \subsection{Highest Astronomical Tide}
    114114 
    115115\input{HAT_damage}
     
    121121     
    122122   \section{References}
    123    \input{references}
    124 
     123    \input{references}
     124   
    125125   \section{Metadata}
    126126     \label{sec:metadata}
    127127     \input{metadata}
    128128
     129   \section{Time series}
     130     \label{sec:timeseries}
     131\input{latexoutput}
     132 \clearpage
     133 
    129134\end{document}
  • production/onslow_2006/report/references.tex

    r3017 r3064  
    33\bibitem{CB:ausgeo} Cummins, P. and Burbidge, D. (2004)
    44Small threat, but warning sounded for tsunami research. AusGeo News 75, 4-7.
     5
     6\bibitem{BC:FESA} Burbidge, D. and Cummins, P. (2005) Preliminary Tsuanmi
     7Hazard Assesment of Western Australia. Report
     8to the Fire and Emergency Services Authority of Western Australia.
    59
    610\bibitem{ON:modsim} Nielsen, O., Roberts, Gray, D., McPherson, A. and
     
    1115URL: http://www.mssanz.org.au/modsim05/papers/nielsen.pdf
    1216
    13 \bibitem{BC:FESA} Burbidge, D. and Cummins, P. (2005) Preliminary Tsuanmi
    14 Hazard Assesment of Western Australia. Report
    15 to the Fire and Emergency Services Authority of Western Australia.
    16 
    1717\bibitem{ken:damage} Dale, K. (year)
    1818
  • production/onslow_2006/report/summary.tex

    r3015 r3064  
    11
    22Further modelling effort is required in the next financial year to
    3 investigate the solution sensitivity to cell resolution and
    4 bathymetry. Further investigation of the point at which
     3investigate the solution sensitivity to cell resolution,
     4bathymetry and tsunami source uncertainties.
     5Further investigation of the point at which
    56ANUGA can use the deep water model output is also required.
  • production/onslow_2006/report/tsunami_scenario.tex

    r3016 r3064  
    1 The tsunamigenic event used for this study is one used
    2 to develop the preliminary tsunami hazard assessment which
    3 was delivered to FESA in September 2005,
    4 \cite{BC:FESA}. In that assessment, a suite of
    5 tsunami were evenly spaced along the Sunda Arc subduction zone and there
     1The tsunamigenic event used for this study was developed for a
     2preliminary tsunami hazard assessment study delivered to FESA in September 2005,
     3\cite{BC:FESA}. In that assessment, a suite of Mw 9 earthquakes
     4were evenly spaced along the Sunda Arc subduction zone and there
    65was no consideration of likelihood. Other sources were not considered, such
    76as intra-plate earthquakes near the WA coast, volcanoes, landslides
     
    1211Current studies underway in GA are building probabilistic
    1312models to develop a more complete tsunami hazard assessment
    14 for the Sunda Arc subduction zone. (This is
    15 due for completion in late 2006.) In the preliminary assessment for
     13for the Sunda Arc subduction zone,
     14due for completion in late 2006. In the preliminary assessment for
    1615example, it was argued that while Mw 7 and 8 earthquakes are expected
    17 to occur with a greater frequency, they are likely to pose a comparatively
    18 low and localised hazard to WA.
     16to occur with a greater frequency than Mw 9 events,
     17they are likely to pose a comparatively low and more localised hazard to WA.
    1918
    2019FESA are interested in the ``most frequent worst case scenario''. Whilst
     
    2221a plausible worst case scenario.
    2322
    24 The following figure is taken from the preliminary assessment and
    25 shows the maximum wave height up to the 50m contour for a Mw 9 event off
    26 the coast of Java. It is this event which provides the source to the
    27 inundation modelling presented in the following section.
    28 
     23Figure \ref{fig:mw9} shows the maximum wave height up to the 50m contour
     24for a Mw 9 event off
     25the coast of Java. It is this event which provides the source and
     26boundary condition to the
     27inundation modelling presented in this report.
    2928
    3029
     
    3837  \label{fig:mw9}
    3938\end{figure}
     39
     40\bf{run run_timeseries.py for some boundary gauges to show
     41what the source provides to teh boundary for this study.}
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