Changeset 4116


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Timestamp:
Dec 22, 2006, 1:31:38 PM (17 years ago)
Author:
ole
Message:

Work on linuxconf paper

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1 edited

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  • anuga_work/publications/linuxconf_2006/paper_ole_nielsen.tex

    r4115 r4116  
    2929O.~M.~Nielsen\thanks{Risk Assessment Methods Project, Geospatial and
    3030Earth Monitoring Division, Geoscience Australia, Symonston,
    31 \textsc{Australia}. \protect\url{mailto:Ole.Nielsen@ga.gov.au}} 
     31\textsc{Australia}. \protect\url{mailto:Ole.Nielsen@ga.gov.au}}\footnotemark[1]
    3232\and
    3333S.~G.~Roberts\thanks{Dept. of Maths, Australian National University,
     
    6464% Use the \verb|abstract| environment.
    6565\begin{abstract}
    66 Geoscience Australia and the Australian National University are
    67 developing a hydrodynamic inundation modelling tool called \AnuGA{}
    68 to help simulate the impact of natural inundation hazards such as
    69 riverine flooding, storm surges and tsunami. The core of \AnuGA{} is
    70 a \Python{} implementation of a finite-volume method for solving the
    71 conservative form of the Shallow Water Wave equation.  In this paper
    72 we describe the parallelisation of the code using a domain
    73 decomposition strategy. We describe the use of the the \Metis{}
    74 graph partitioning library to decompose our finite volume meshes.
    75 The parallel efficiency of our code is tested using a number of mesh
    76 partitions, and we verify that the \Metis{} graph partition is
    77 particularly efficient.
     66Modelling the effects on the built environment of natural hazards such
     67as riverine flooding, storm surges and tsunami is critical for
     68understanding their economic and social impact on our urban
     69communities.  Geoscience Australia and the Australian National
     70University have developed a hydrodynamic inundation modelling tool
     71called \AnuGA{} to help simulate the impact of these hazards.
     72The core of \AnuGA{} is a \Python{} implementation of a finite-volume method
     73for solving the conservative form of the Shallow Water Wave equation.
     74In this paper we describe the model, the architecture and some applications.
     75ANUGA has recently been released as Open Source. This strategy will enable
     76free access to the software and allow the risk research community to
     77use, validate and contribute to the software in the future.
     78
     79%This method allows the study area to be represented by an unstructured
     80%mesh with variable resolution to suit the particular problem.  The
     81%conserved quantities are water level (stage) and horizontal momentum.
     82%An important capability of ANUGA is that it can robustly model the
     83%process of wetting and drying as water enters and leaves an area. This
     84%means that it is suitable for simulating water flow onto a beach or
     85%dry land and around structures such as buildings.
     86%
     87%To set up a particular scenario the user generates a mesh with regions
     88%and boundary segments identified by symbolic tags used to bind values
     89%to arbitrary functions supplied during the simulation.  In addition,
     90%all quantities may be assigned or updated by supplying either constant
     91%values, arbitrary functions or general expressions combining existing
     92%quantities.  Arbitrary forcing terms such such as wind stress or
     93%atmospheric pressure gradients may also be supplied.  While this
     94%interface provides great flexibility due to Python's object model,
     95%dynamic typing and constructs such as generators, the computationally
     96%intensive components are written for efficiency in the C language
     97%working directly with the Numerical Python structures.
    7898\end{abstract}
    7999
     
    443463
    444464
    445 \paragraph{Acknowledgements:}
    446 The authors are grateful to Belinda Barnes, National Centre for
    447 Epidemiology and Population Health, Australian National University,
    448 and Matt Hayne and Augusto Sanabria, Risk Research Group, Geoscience
    449 Australia, for helpful reviews of a previous version of this paper.
    450 Author Nielsen publish with the permission of the CEO, Geoscience
    451 Australia.
     465%\paragraph{Acknowledgements:}
     466%The authors are grateful to Belinda Barnes, National Centre for
     467%Epidemiology and Population Health, Australian National University,
     468%and Matt Hayne and Augusto Sanabria, Risk Research Group, Geoscience
     469%Australia, for helpful reviews of a previous version of this paper.
     470%Author Nielsen publish with the permission of the CEO, Geoscience
     471%Australia.
    452472
    453473% Preferably provide your bibliography as a separate .bbl file.
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