Changeset 7501


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Sep 9, 2009, 1:22:42 PM (11 years ago)
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ole
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  • anuga_work/publications/boxing_day_validation_2008/method.tex

    r7481 r7501  
    11\section{Modelling the Event}\label{sec:models}
    22Numerous models are currently used to model and predict tsunami
    3 generation, propagation and run-up. These range in solving different equations and employing
    4 different methodologies with some examples being~\cite{titov97a,satake95,zhang08}. Here we
    5 introduce the modelling methodology employed by Geoscience Australia
    6 to illustrate the utility of the proposed benchmark. The methodology used by Geoscience Australia has three distinct components. Firstly an appropriate model is used to approximate the initial sea surface deformation. This model is chosen according to the cause of the intial disturbance. The resulting wave is propagated using the \textsc{ursga} model (see Section~\ref{sec:ursga}) in the deep ocean until the wave reaches shallow water, typically the $100$ m depth contour. The ocean surface profile along this contour is used as a time varying boundary condition for the \textsc{anuga} model (see Section~\ref{sec:anuga}) which simulates the propagation of the tsunami within the shallow water and the subsequent inundation of the land. This three part methodology roughly follows the three stages of tsunami evolution. The components used to model each stage of evolution are described in more detail below.
     3generation, propagation and run-up. These range in solving different
     4equations and employing different methodologies with some examples
     5being~\cite{titov97a,satake95,zhang08}. Here we introduce the
     6modelling methodology employed by Geoscience Australia to illustrate
     7the utility of the proposed benchmark. The methodology used by
     8Geoscience Australia has three distinct components. Firstly an
     9appropriate model is used to approximate the initial sea surface
     10deformation. This model is chosen according to the cause of the intial
     11disturbance. The resulting wave is propagated using the \textsc{ursga}
     12model (see Section~\ref{sec:ursga}) in the deep ocean until the wave
     13reaches shallow water, typically the $100$ m depth contour. The ocean
     14surface profile along this contour is used as a time varying boundary
     15condition for the \textsc{anuga} model (see Section~\ref{sec:anuga})
     16which simulates the propagation of the tsunami within the shallow
     17water and the subsequent inundation of the land. This three part
     18methodology roughly follows the three stages of tsunami evolution. The
     19components used to model each stage of evolution are described in more
     20detail below.
    721
    822\subsection{Generation}\label{sec:modelGeneration}
     
    7993co-seismic sea floor deformation. \textsc{ursga} is well suited to
    8094modelling propagation over large domains and is used to propagate the tsunami
    81 until it reaches shallow water, typically the $100$m depth contour.
     95until it reaches shallow water, typically the $100$ m depth contour.
    8296%The propagation of the tsunami in shallow water ($<100$m) and inundation are modelled using a hydrodynamic package called \textsc{ursga}. This package is ideally suited to shallow water propagation and inundation as it accurately simulates flow over dry land and is based upon an irregular triangular grid which can be refined in areas of interest.
    8397
     
    106120Geoscience Australia tsunami modelling methodology is based on a
    107121hybrid approach using models like \textsc{ursga} for tsunami
    108 propagation up to an offshore depth contour, typically 100 m.
     122propagation up to an offshore depth contour, typically $100$ m.
    109123%Specifically we use the \textsc{ursga} model to simulate the
    110124%propagation of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in the deep ocean, based
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