Changeset 7551


Ignore:
Timestamp:
Oct 16, 2009, 2:08:01 PM (13 years ago)
Author:
sexton
Message:

minor typos as picked up by GL

Location:
anuga_work/publications/boxing_day_validation_2008
Files:
2 edited

Legend:

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  • anuga_work/publications/boxing_day_validation_2008/results.tex

    r7535 r7551  
    116116
    117117After propagating the tsunami in the open ocean using \textsc{ursga},
    118 the approximated ocean and surface elevation and horizontal flow
     118the approximated ocean surface elevation and horizontal flow
    119119speeds were extracted and used to construct a boundary condition
    120120for the \textsc{anuga} model. The interface between the \textsc{ursga}
     
    164164As the \textsc{Ursga} model in this study was used to compute the
    165165incident wave along the 100~m contour line only, there is no such
    166 information available at at each side of the \textsc{Anuga}
     166information available at each side of the \textsc{Anuga}
    167167domain towards the south and the north. Instead,
    168168a transmissive boundary condition was chosen for these segments,
     
    170170height present just inside the computational domain.
    171171The velocity field on these boundaries was kept at
    172 to zero during the simulation.
     172zero during the simulation.
    173173Other choices include applying the mean tide value as a
    174174Dirichlet boundary condition. Experiments as well as the
     
    184184at Patong Bay. Although the tsunami propagated for approximately three
    185185hours before it reached Patong Bay, the period of time during which
    186 the wave propagated through the \textsc{anuga} domain is much smaller
     186the wave propagated through the \textsc{anuga} domain is much smaller by
    187187of the order of two~hours. Consequently the assumption of constant tide
    188188height is reasonable. The initial water level for the river was set to
     
    260260indicates a good model prediction of the survey.
    261261
    262 Discrepancies between the survey data and the modelled inundation
    263 include arise from errors and uncertainties in both the field surveys and the models.
     262Discrepancies between the survey data and the modelled inundation 
     263arise from errors and uncertainties in both the field surveys and the models.
    264264The former include measurement errors in the GPS survey recordings and
    265265missing data in the field survey data itself.
  • anuga_work/publications/boxing_day_validation_2008/sensitivity.tex

    r7531 r7551  
    7777Table~\ref{table:inundationAreas} it is apparent that densely built-up
    7878areas act as dissipators greatly reducing the inundated area.
    79 Figure~\ref{fig:sensitivity_buildings_speed} show the associated flow speeds in the presence and absence of buildings (bare earth).
     79Figure~\ref{fig:sensitivity_buildings_speed} shows the associated flow speeds in the presence and absence of buildings (bare earth).
    8080It is evident that flow speeds
    8181tend to increase in passages between buildings but slow down in areas behind them as compared to the bare earth scenario.
     
    9999Friction = 0.0003 & 0.83 & 0.26 \\
    100100Friction = 0.03 & 0.67 & 0.09\\
    101 Boundary wave hight minus 10 cm & 0.77 & 0.17 \\
    102 Boundary wave hight plus 10 cm & 0.82 & 0.22 \\
     101Boundary wave height minus 10 cm & 0.77 & 0.17 \\
     102Boundary wave height plus 10 cm & 0.82 & 0.22 \\
    103103No Buildings & 0.94 & 0.44 \\
    104104\hline
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